Garden Urns

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The best garden urns like this one, remain empty for life.  Not just low maintenance, they are no maintenance.  This is one of a pair flanking an entry onto the lawn.  Set upon a plinth of McMillan Bricks, these cast iron urns welcome folks through the entrance in the native holly (inkberry) hedge.  Tara Dillard […]

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Hewell’s Terracota Garden Pots

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Hewell Pottery and Goodness Grows

Hewell’s Pottery in Gillsville, Georgia celebrates more than 150 years of turning and burning.  Seventh generation now produces garden terracotta worth the trip.  You can also find Hewell pots at Goodness Grows Nursery in Lexington, GA.  Handmade terracotta is more frost resistant than machine molded.  and it looks, handmade. We drove to Goodness Grows yesterday.  […]

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A Bench for 50 Years

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A place to sit and rest.  To visit.  This plantation teak bench should last for 50 years or more.  How to care for Teak?  Leave it alone.  Do not paint it, stain it, seal it.  Do not, do not pressure wash it.  Permission granted to age silvery grey.  A generous young fig tree to provide […]

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Daffodil Calendar

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Daffodil calendar begins in March when Brent and Beckys Bulbs publish their spring/fall catalog.  Order before July 1 and receive a discount. Living in  Plant Hardiness Zone 8, we receive bulbs  in late November.  Plant them in December.   Division 2 Daffodils do well in the South.  Division 7 are Jonquils.  Narcissus are simply great bulbs […]

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Ownership of the Natural World

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tatsoi, a mustard family member

This is Tatsoi, a green from the mustard family.  Grown from non patented, untreated, open pollinated seed, it has the opportunity to reseed itself generation after generation.  Adapting over time to the conditions at Hedgerow Farm.  This concept is referred to as dynamic farming.  We can also save the seed and replant where we want.  […]

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Legacy bulbs

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spring bulbs

Pansies are instant gratification.  There’s room in the garden for pansies.  Bulb planting asks that we plan ahead, anticipate, and then enjoy years of delight lasting long after the digging and perhaps long after the digger is gone.  The ghosts of old homesteads reside among the daffodils  in now empty fields.  A testament to a […]

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Formality and Rusticity

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Italian Cypress

The Long Barn and Chicken Run.  Farm rustic, confirmed by roosters, hens, turkeys, and old fig trees nearby.  The evergreen structure of camellias, boxwood, and recently added Italian Cypress add formality, beauty, shade, and hiding places for the creatures of HF.   Crape Myrtle lined walkway gives additional shade in the summer months.  Folding wooden chairs […]

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Pollen Baskets and Blooms

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Honey bees in Georgia are collecting pollen even in winter.  That spot of yellow on the leg is a basket designed for carrying pollen from local plants to the local hive. no more than five miles apart.    Honeybees in California’s almond fields are definitely not local.  They are trucked in from around the USA […]

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Signs of Spring

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Jacob lamb and Carlton Daffodils

Lambs appear in springtime, at least around here they do.  Most will be found in the pasture.   Bilbo Baggins was just visiting.  The daffodils are Division II,  Carltons.  They do well in southeast. This we learned from Brent and Becky’s most wonderful catalogue.  more on daffodils another day.    

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Blooms in Winter

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Camellia in January

The piedmont area of Georgia was rezoned recently.  In terms of Plant Hardiness Zone.  Thankfully the Camellia, known as Winter Rose, continues to thrive here.  Sasanquas bloom from September to December and then the Japonicas in mid winter through spring.   The American Camellia Society  headquartered in Fort Valley, Georgia hosts a Camellia festival in February.

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